Food Photography Tips

If you are a keen photographer, then you have probably tried a whole range of styles, from wildlife photography to sports photography. If you are looking to expand your portfolio and enhance your photography skills, then why not consider taking up food photography?

Food photography might sound easy but there is a lot to learn. There is more to food photography than simply taking a picture of the dish. You have to consider the lighting, the composition and the angle. If you are keen to learn more about food photography, why not leave your online game of Solitaire or Cheekybingo for later and check out the tips below?

These are tips based on what I’ve learned so far as I take photos for our food blog. I don’t claim to be an expert, but I’ve learned a lot over the past months as I continue to read and practice.

 

Fill the Frame

If you want to create the atmosphere of a packed table full of food at a dinner party, try utilizing all the space in the frame. Pick one dish and make it your subject for the frame. Use a small aperture, so the main dish is in focus and the surrounding food is softly blurred out.

Fresh Fruit Halo-halo with Gata

 

Getting a Classy and Minimalist Effect

If you want to show a dish which is classy, simplicity is the best effect. However, simplicity is different to having a bare or empty frame, so make sure you look for an angle that doesn’t make you feel like you’re wanting more substance. This can be tricky, but with practice, you’ll soon have the eye for it.

Cinnamon Raisin Bread - CertifiedFoodies.com
 

Composition

Some food can be arranged just how you want them. Things like scallops look very effective when they are all lined up neatly. This works really well if you use a shallow depth of field because this really isolates your subject from the background.

T.G.I. Friday's Burger Sliders - CertifiedFoodies.com

 

Have Your Cake and Eat It

Food is intended to be eaten and enjoyed. There’s something charming and appealing about seeing crumbs scattered around a half-eaten pie dish. A few crumbs scattered about, a rumpled cloth napkin in the corner of the frame or even an open sugar packet and half-drank espresso all adds to the atmosphere.

A shot of ristretto with Van Houten semi-sweet chocolates

      
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